Community Peace Building Academy for Senior Care Facilities

Feb14

By John McShane, Community Programs Director

One of my favorite participants in a peacebuilding workshop at a resident retired community told the following story: “Looking back, many of us can remember a time when we were picked on, bullied, or, in some way, made to feel unwelcome or alone. Sadly, this sometimes continues as we move to apartment or resident retired communities. It’s like high school all over again.” She continued, “The difference is that in high school, you had a friend to talk to or could even go home at the end of the day. Worst case was that you knew you were getting out of school one day, that there was an end in sight. The difference here, though, is that for new residents, we don’t have friends yet, we aren’t going home at the end of the day, and for many of us this is the last place we are going to live. We deserve better than that.”

Peace Learning Center began hosting community peace building workshops for retired communities in 2015. The training was provided to residents, staff, and management. Results were impressive. One Service Coordinator reports that:

  • Many residents’ shared they have decided to stay housed in the community.
  • Residents report an increased sense of belonging.
  • Residents are protecting, caring, and contributing to their community. Some Residents are volunteering to host events for the community and residents are also beginning to seek volunteer opportunities in the greater community.
  • Residents are reporting they are very satisfied with the apartment community, Service Coordination program, and the property management team.
  • Residents now have social and community connections.

Based on successes, experiences, and lessons learned, we have created a two-day “Train the Trainer” workshop for Service Coordinators and Social Service Workers, the Community Peace Building Academy. Prospective participants are those who serve either apartment based or residential communities. This two day workshop will be hosted at Peace Learning Center’s Indianapolis facility on March 23 and 24, 2017.

Course materials are based on PLC original work and the Help Increase the Peace Program (HIPP) manual created by the American Friends Service Committee, a time tested curriculum for community peace building. Participants will learn to facilitate PLC learning modules based on:

  • Conflict resolution
  • Communication skills
  • Community problem solving
  • Understanding diversity
  • Assumptions (Gossip!) and open mindedness

Academy graduates will be certified HIPP and PLC workshop facilitators and will be able to facilitate workshops at their own facilities. Valued at $600 per participant, PLC will provide books, materials, and lunch for the two-day training.

Working with the retired community has been a surprising and beautiful experience. Building and a sense of shared community through dialogue and storytelling has been powerful for all participants – including me. I’ve met and learned from an original “Rosie, The Riveter,” who shared her stories of building airplanes during WWII. I shared memories with Santa Clause! My friend, John, was a Santa at Indianapolis’ L.S. Ayers and Company in the early 1970’s. John told proud stories of his red velvet Santa suit. (There were two, actually. One to wear while the other was at the cleaners!) John and I did some math and think I may have sat on his lap, “back in the Day!”

The community spirit of dialogue with dignity and respect has been a springboard for minimizing conflict and misunderstandings. Watching residents create and grow their own peaceful communities has been inspirational. The Community Peace Builders Academy will help other facilitators to continue the work!

Find out more and register here

Peace From the Eyes of Rose Voigt, Intern

Feb07

Because I believe that conflict is inevitable, the meaning of peace and how to achieve it will always change with time. Peace means open and honest conversation is encouraged, and no one is silenced. Healthy mediation is in place, and nonviolent tactics are used to manage conflicts. Honest and respectful relationships exist, and individuals protect one another. I think that peace can be achieved, however, it is not an easy task by any means. Peace can be achieved through mediation, conversation, democracy, and nonviolence.

My most memorable moment with PLC so far was helping with the MLK 19th Annual Community Festival on January 14th. I really enjoyed being a part of such an important event for our community. Participating in this event was an honor, and I truly have learned more about leadership.

“Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared” is a quote by Buddha I live by.  I always want to live a peaceful life and constantly try to make other people feel more happy and accepted.


Rose is currently taking a short break from school. She was previously at Butler University from Fall 2015-Fall 2016 in the Peace and Conflict Studies program. After this semester off from school, she will be attending IUPUI to study Philanthropy. Rose has a broad interest in all social issues, but in particular, she finds herself mainly focusing on gender equality, racism, and environmental issues. She finds all social issues valid and of extreme importance; however, these are ones she often finds particularly important. Aside from school, she loves music, and plays piano and violin for fun. She also loves hanging out with her cats in her free time.

Peace, From the Eyes of Lexie Brown, Intern

Jan30

To me, Peace means the opportunity for genuine dialogue. As Martin Buber called it, the “I and Thou” moments. In those moments, there are no hidden agendas, no assumptions, and no judgments. There are only people coming together to talk and listen.  I think peace can be achieved through the “I and Thou” moments. Everyone just needs to be willing to open themselves up to others. 

It is hard for me to pick a most memorable moment at Peace Learning Center, as all of my moments have been memorable. I have only been there for two weeks, but I have already learned quite a bit about what it is like behind the scenes at a nonprofit. I will also never forget how everyone was kind and welcomed me in from the very beginning. 

To quote my favorite lyric, from my favorite song in the musical RENT, “Forget regret, or life is yours to miss.”  I try to live by this quote because life is too short to have regrets. Worrying over something behind you can keep you from learning the lessons of the past. Not only that, but it can keep you from enjoying yourself in the present.

Read more

A TED Talk Inspired Spiritual Talk Series WALK THE TALK: COMPASSION

Dec05

wtt-compassion-posterThe Vogue | Wednesday, December 14, 2016

INDIANAPOLIS – Walk the Talk: Compassion continues the innovative TED Talk inspired Spiritual Talk series, and will showcase six speakers discussing and sharing personal stories about compassion. The event will also feature live music, confetti, interactive activities and a Motivational Balloon drop, making it an over-the-top show unlike any other speaker series! Walk the Talk: Compassion will be held on Wednesday, December 14, 2016 at 8:00 p.m. (doors open at 7:15 p.m.) at The Vogue in Broad Ripple (6259 N. College Avenue).

Tickets are on sale now ($15, plus applicable fees) at the Vogue Box Office, TheVogue.com, and Ticketfly.com. Tickets will also be available for purchase at the door on the day of the event.

The six speakers of Walk the Talk: Compassion will inspire, motivate and awaken the mind with messages of how compassion has affected their lives by answering the question: What does compassion mean to you? Speakers will include:

  • Jessica Froelich – Jessica Froelich is on a mission to make the world a more peaceful, loving place, and as a love warrior, has made a lifelong commitment to deepening her connection to the power of unconditional love. A storyteller at heart, she has always enjoyed performance arts and acting on stage and in film. Her authentic, open expression of emotions provides others with a raw, un-edited reminder of the beauty in our human nature, and through the lens of compassion, she will take listeners on a journey, opening their eyes to transformation.
  • Rory Colgan – As a writer who published his first book in 2007, Rory Colgan will share insightful metaphysical concepts applied to topics in self-help, meditation and philosophy. Rory is the founder of the educational platform Inner Health Today, which focuses on aiding others to become healthy, wealthy and influential in the realms of spiritual, mental and emotional development. He graduated from the School of Metaphysics with a Qui Docet Discit and is a certified Dream Coach, helping others to understand their dreams and the relation to each individual’s life.
  • Kunal Vyas – A Zionsville, Indiana native, Kunal Vyas is passionate about his family, connecting with the community and helping others reach their full potential. Growing up amongst a diverse religious community in rural poverty in India, he has become a humble man with compassion toward all humanity. Even as a father of three, a philosopher and a husband with a full-time job and small business, Kunal is dedicated to spending his life making the world a blissful place, serving many hours rebuilding the community, helping people in need and feeding thousands of those left homeless.
  • Kathy Slaughter – Lifelong student Kathy Slaughter currently pursues the craft of psychotherapy, where she specializes in human sexuality, relationships and trauma at her practice in Broad Ripple. Her passion for personal growth and self-development is matched only by her interest in teaching others through one-on-one interactions, workshops and events. Kathy thrives on compassioante conversations that lead others to new realizations about their own lives.
  • Tim Nation – Tim Nation is the cofounder and executive director of Peace Learning Center, an Indianapolis-based educational institution that teaches peace-building and communication skills, and has served 200,000 people since 1997. With a background in management and public relations, Tim previously served as the director of Indiana AmeriCorps, and is a member of the Greater Indianapolis Progress Committee, Chair of the Indianapolis Race & Cultural Relations Leadership Network and was named a “Distinguished Hoosier” by Indiana Governor Frank O’Bannon.
  • Richard Brendan – Inspiring and passionate, Richard Brendan brings love to life through his speaking, coaching and producing. He hosts a weekly radio program on WICR and has been both a producer and narrator for several TV projects, namely for WFYI and PBS. As founder of JourneysFire International, he produces innovative programs and events using media, arts and education. Richard also takes numerous trips to Haiti, where he provides for the less fortunate by speaking and providing humanitarian aid to assist in the relief efforst for children and families.

Listeners should arrive open to new information and ready to experience the vision of Walk the Talk, with the expectation of receiving key “take-aways” that can be immediately integrated into their daily lives, improving the overall quality and awareness of each person’s life and those close to them.

For more information, please contact steve@walkthetalkseries.com or visit www.walkthetalkseries.com.

From the Intern

Nov03

I love being at IUPUI because of the extra little somethings, exhibits, and events the campus hosts to promote the never-ending amounts of diversity we have pouring into Indianapolis. Today there was an Allies for Inclusion: The Ability Exhibit, emphasizing the inclusion for those who may be mentally or physically disabled. Though there may be challenges they are still able to do whatever they might set their mind to.

Starbucks also just released and has begun selling their holiday cups as we approach the holiday season. There have already been complaints about the cup not being red or not including Santa or Jesus on the cup. Some tweets have gone as far as to accuse Starbucks of hating Christmas. All of this because of a cup. Howard Schultz spoke up prior to the cup design being released. He expressed that the cup was covered with a vast amount of people and faces all of different origins and diverse appearances to exemplify unity and the act of standing together.

Inclusion is not hard, and we’re all here together, striving for whatever dream we have. Instead of pushing one another down or ignoring someone entirely, in my eyes, building each other up is the only productive way to live with others.

 

Motivational Monday

Oct17

Birthdays are the one day a year when it is socially acceptable to celebrate yourself.

I think this is a good thing because some people probably need limits, however, I also think we each need to credit ourselves a little more.  I think we deserve more than one day a year to say, “I am actually pretty great.”

It’s not being self-obsessed or narcissistic, it’s acknowledging the single fact: you are a wonderful human being, and you deserve so many good things. Everyone is busy in day to day life, but almost everyone, one day  a year, will allow others to treat them, allow themselves a pat on the back, and really appreciate themselves.

We need to do this more often.  Don’t let yourself become full of hot air by any means, but really appreciate yourself.  Look at you!  Do you realize how much you have accomplished? Do you realize there is nobody out there like you? There is nobody with your gusto, your heart, or your mind.  That alone is something to celebrate.

Don’t compare your accomplishments to the next guy’s either.  His little victories are different than yours. You don’t even need anyone else to think what you choose to celebrate over is  big deal; if it matters to you, congratulations to you! Life is busy, someone will always be worse than you, and someone will always be better than you.  Pay no mind, and celebrate yourself.

From the Intern

Sep27

I’m a college student.  And it’s weird.

Weird might not even be the right word.  It is sincerely overwhelming.  In 2016, everyone knows just about everything, or are aware of it.  Same gender love is alive and well, it’s considered common knowledge to address someone by the gender he/she identify with, and cultures from all over the world are being embraced.  It’s a beautiful time to be alive.

In the midst of it all, it’s almost easier to get lost. There’s hurt and pain while there’s celebration and happiness.  There’s anger and forgiveness.  There’s pressure to know who you are.   There’s pressure to be open-minded and adventurous.  There’s pressure to be on a track for your life and know what you’re going to do forever.  It’s a lot to take in, a lot to decide, and even more to discover.

Everyone says you find yourself in your twenties, yet it’s also the time people want straight answers as to what you want to do with your life.  With the pressure, I think it so important to remember the journey makes the destination worth it. Your journey is what builds your life with experiences and memories, it’s what makes you excited to return somewhere or inspired for your future.

It’s not that I don’t care about giving people answers, but I always try to remember it’s okay if I don’t have my future entirely planned. It’s okay if one month I want to a be Marketing Director, but maybe in the next week I’m interested in Event Planning.  My experiences are shaping me and exposing me to the infinite paths I have in this life.  It is so easy to stress about who I am or what my purpose is in life.  Sometimes it’s harder to remember and push through that stress, but always see yourself for the little observative, learning and experiencing sponge you are.

Continue to grow little sponge, you are ever-changing and ever-learning.

From the Intern

Sep15

Recently my lovely, kind-hearted boss married the love of her life.  Even more recently, I looked at the pictures from the celebration of love.

Sitting in my lecture at 9am, I am entirely caught up in the photos of the brides.  I am in awe of their beauty and I am in awe of their love for one another.  It’s evident.  Never mind the wedding dresses, the wedding rings, the wedding bouquets, never mind all of the obvious, and look.  The way they look at each other, the chemistry between the two of them as they hug each other.  It is sincerely something of a dream.

I have been told I am very expressive.  My fifth grade teacher told my parents to help me control my facial expressions because my feelings are often on my face. I am a transparent person in all the right ways, you know?  One of my friends and I matched yesterday, and we took a bunch of pictures and she captioned it, “I need to find someone that looks at me the way Ari looks at me when we match.”

I told my boss I hope I find someone that looks at me the way she and her new wife look at each other.

I know it’s a beautiful experience to see people out and see them so shamelessly involved in one another.  My friends have captured numerous pictures of me looking at them, and it’s obvious.  I am so in love with my friends and the people in my life.  I’m not embarrassed about it.  I care insanely and deeply about the people I have in my life.  People shy away from it, and they’re bashful about being blunt about their feelings.

But why?  Why hide away from some of the most natural human feelings, the feelings that bring us more joy than any?  What if we all showed our love for one another?  What if we all let ourselves openly care for those near and dear to us?  I love loving.  I love caring.  I love the people in my life and I love letting them know.  I’ve been told I say “I love you” more than most people, and that’s someone else’s opinion.  If you’re telling me that, I’m probably telling you.  You are loved. What a good feeling that is!

What’s better than feeling you’re loved and cared for?  It’s my favorite feeling.  I will shamelessly love and I will let those who deserve it know.  I challenge you to join me to love.  Love openly and care deeply, don’t hold it back.

Motivational Monday

Sep12

Think of the last time you communicated with someone.  What do you think of? A conversation with words, a phone call, or text?

Communicating can be anything from a greeting to a wave, to simply listening. The tone of your voice can say more than your words.  When solving a conflict, it’s important to keep your tone and your words kind.  Conflicts can easily be frustrating, but the way one goes about it can determine the outcome.  When discussing a problem, focus on the end goal.  What can be done to get there?  It is not about blaming one party or the other.  It is about coming to a resolution.

Listening is such a vital part of communication.  It’s often forgotten about amidst the words in conversation.  When you listen, you are receiving information.  When you listen, it gives you time to process what is being said.  When you listen, you take the time to decide the best way to respond.  It is not just about who can talk the longest or who has the most to say, but it’s about being active on either side of the conversation.

Sometimes people don’t need a response from the listener at all.  Sometimes we just need someone to listen, and sometimes we just need to talk.  One way or another, it’s important to be present when in conversation.

From the Intern

Sep08

This past Labor Day, I took a trip out to the falls.  I misjudged the busyness of the falls, and when I arrived, the entire area was hosting quite the number of people.

On this trip, I went alone.  The plan was to climb to the top of the fall and sit on the rock that overlooks the drop and the bank it flows into, and to read some assignments for class. Instead, I only read maybe one act of my play, spoke to people for longer than I intended, and naturally, people watched.

People watching is such a funny concept that has become fairly socially accepted.  While I sat on my little perch, I watched as people talked and took pictures for each other.  Everyone smiling and watching out for each other as they climbed over rocks and through the baby currents.  It reminded me of the holiday season or a festival.  The atmosphere had such a connecldblog2ted, interpersonal feeling.  I sat there and thought about everyone and how they were interacting.

I realized if we were all in a mall or somewhere just as goal oriented, hardly anyone would be stopping to say a small hello to a passerby.  People would not be as open as they are on a beautifully sunny day, or at a festival.  Honestly, that made me kind of sad.  I recognize everyone has their own agenda.  I’m okay with people being busy, but for it to have to be a special event, or Labor Day in an exciting park of strangers to connect with each other bums me out.

Picture this: everyone interacting and doing small actions to connect with one another.  Anywhere and any day of the year could be special.  I’m not saying you should be late to every meeting because you stopped to say hello to every single person. I don’t think it should have to be the place or time or the year dictating the atmosphere.  As Pittacus Lore said, “A place is only as good as the people…it’s the people that make the place.”

We each are more than capable of making any place special for anyone, and that in itself is a beautiful power we all hold.ldblog

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